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Just a bit of macro photography inspiration…


This image of an ant's head, viewed from the front (at 10X) took 11th place in the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition. The ant's autofluorescence was observed using confocal micrsocopy by Dr. Jan Michels of Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel, in Kiel, Germany


This image of an ant’s head, viewed from the front (at 10X) took 11th place in the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competiti
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on. The ant’s autofluorescence was observed using confocal micrsocopy by Dr. Jan Michels of Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel, in Kiel, Germany. (Dr. Jan Michels)


Dr. Douglas Clark of San Francisco, California submitted this image of the dried wing scales of a butterfly (Cethosia biblis) in incandescent light


Dr. Douglas Clark of San Francisco, California submitted this image of the dried wing scales of a butterfly (Cethosia biblis) in incandescent light. (Dr. Douglas Clark)


HeLa cancer cells viewed at 300x are seen in this 12th Place image by Thomas Deerinck from the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research in La Jolla, California. HeLa is an immortal cell line used in scientific research, made of cells originally sampled from cancer patient Henrietta Lacks in 1951


HeLa cancer cells viewed at 300x are seen in this 12th Place image by Thomas Deerinck from the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research in La Jolla, California. HeLa is an immortal cell line used in scientific research, made of cells originally sampled from cancer patient Henrietta Lacks in 1951. (Thomas Deerinck)


The eye of a live giant waterflea (Leptodora kindtii), observed and submitted by Wim van Egmond of the Micropolitan Museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands


The eye of a live giant waterflea (Leptodora kindtii), observed and submitted by Wim van Egmond of the Micropolitan Museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands. (Wim van Egmond)


Taking 4th place in the competition, Dr. Robin Young of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia used intrinsic fluorescence to observe this specimen of liverwort (Lepidozia reptans) at 20x


Taking 4th place in the competition, Dr. Robin Young of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia used intrinsic fluorescence to observe this specimen of liverwort (Lepidozia reptans) at 20x. (Dr. Robin Young)


Crystal twinning patterns in a leucite crystal from volcanic rock, observed in polarized light by Dr. Michael M. Raith of the Steinmann Institut, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany


Crystal twinning patterns in a leucite crystal from volcanic rock, observed in polarized light by Dr. Michael M. Raith of the Steinmann Institut, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany. (Dr. Michael M. Raith)


A water flea (Daphnia sp.) among green algae (Volvox sp.), an image by Dr. Ralf Wagner of Düsseldorf, Germany


A water flea (Daphnia sp.) among green algae (Volvox sp.), an image by Dr. Ralf Wagner of Düsseldorf, Germany. (Dr. Ralf Wagner)


Pekka Honkakoski of Iisalmi, Finland captured this image of a rare column snowflake with thin, knifelike ice extensions, lit in part by red and blue lighting from opposite sides


Pekka Honkakoski of Iisalmi, Finland captured this image of a rare column snowflake with thin, knifelike ice extensions, lit in part by red and blue lighting from opposite sides. (Pekka Honkakoski)


The embryonic pectoral fin of Chiloscyllium plagiosum, the Whitespotted bamboo shark, observed by Dr. Andrew Gillis, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK


The embryonic pectoral fin of Chiloscyllium plagiosum, the Whitespotted bamboo shark, observed by Dr. Andrew Gillis, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. (Dr. Andrew Gillis)


Taking 20th place was Douglas Moore of the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point in Stevens Point, Wisconsin. Moore's entry shows unpolished agatized dinosaur bone cells, fossilized cellular structure from an animal that lived some 150 million years ago, viewed at 42x


Taking 20th place was Douglas Moore of the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point in Stevens Point, Wisconsin. Moore’s entry shows unpolished agatized dinosaur bone cells, fossilized cellular structure from an animal that lived some 150 million years ago, viewed at 42x. (Douglas Moore)


Charles Krebs from Issaquah, Washington brings us this portrait of a water boatman (Corixidae sp.), viewed in reflected light


Charles Krebs from Issaquah, Washington brings us this portrait of a water boatman (Corixidae sp.), viewed in reflected light. (Charles Krebs)


Primary rat neurons grown as neurospheres, observed by Dr. Rowan Orme of Keele University, Keele, UK


Primary rat neurons grown as neurospheres, observed by Dr. Rowan Orme of Keele University, Keele, UK. (Dr. Rowan Orme)


The double compound eyes of a male St. Mark's fly (Bibio marci), submitted by Dr. David Maitland from Feltwell, UK


The double compound eyes of a male St. Mark’s fly (Bibio marci), submitted by Dr. David Maitland from Feltwell, UK. (Dr. David Maitland)


A naturally formed frost crystal that had grown overnight on a fence in -15 degrees C weather. Image from Jesper Grønne of Silkeborg, Denmark


A naturally formed frost crystal that had grown overnight on a fence in -15 degrees C weather. Image from Jesper Grønne of Silkeborg, Denmark. (Jesper Grønne)


A fish louse (Argulus), viewed at 60x by Wim van Egmond of the Micropolitan Museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands


A fish louse (Argulus), viewed at 60x by Wim van Egmond of the Micropolitan Museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands. (Wim van Egmond)


A closeup view of a velvet mite (Eutrombidium rostratus) by Dr. David Maitland from Feltwell, UK


A closeup view of a velvet mite (Eutrombidium rostratus) by Dr. David Maitland from Feltwell, UK. (Dr. David Maitland)


Dr. Torsten Wittmann of the University of California, San Fransisco, submitted this image of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (BPAE) cells fixed and stained for actin, mitochondria, and DNA


Dr. Torsten Wittmann of the University of California, San Fransisco, submitted this image of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (BPAE) cells fixed and stained for actin, mitochondria, and DNA. (Dr. Torsten Wittmann)


Debora Leite of the University of Sao Paulo, in Sao Paulo, Brazil observed this cross-section of the structure of a sugarcane root


Debora Leite of the University of Sao Paulo, in Sao Paulo, Brazil observed this cross-section of the structure of a sugarcane root. (Debora Leite)


Taking 10th place is this 100x view of a freshwater water flea (Daphnia magna), submitted by Joan Röhl of the Institute for Biochemistry and Biology in Potsdam, Germany


Taking 10th place is this 100x view of a freshwater water flea (Daphnia magna), submitted by Joan Röhl of the Institute for Biochemistry and Biology in Potsdam, Germany. (Joan Röhl)


James H. Nicholson of the Coral Culture and Collaborative Research Facility, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCEHBR & HML in Charleston, South Carolina took 15th Place with this image of lobe coral (Porites lobata), displaying tissue pigmentation response with red fluorescence at 12x


James H. Nicholson of the Coral Culture and Collaborative Research Facility, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCEHBR & HML in Charleston, South Carolina took 15th Place with this image of lobe coral (Porites lobata), displaying tissue pigmentation response with red fluorescence at 12x. (James H. Nicholson)


The 1st place winner, a portrait of a green lacewing (Chrysopa sp.) larva (20x) by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz of the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, Germany


The 1st place winner, a portrait of a green lacewing (Chrysopa sp.) larva (20x) by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz of the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, Germany. (Dr. Igor Siwanowicz)


Benjamin Blonder, David Elliott took 18th place for their image of the venation network of a young quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) leaf. Blonder and Elliott are from the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona


Benjamin Blonder, David Elliott took 18th place for their image of the venation network of a young quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) leaf. Blonder and Elliott are from the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. (Benjamin Blonder, David Elliott)


Jonathan Franks of the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, used autofluorescence to observe this algae biofilm


Jonathan Franks of the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, used autofluorescence to observe this algae biofilm. (Jonathan Franks)


The head and eye of a freshwater shrimp, observed by Jose R. Almodovar of the Microscopy Center, Biology Department, UPR Mayaguez Campus, in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico


The head and eye of a freshwater shrimp, observed by Jose R. Almodovar of the Microscopy Center, Biology Department, UPR Mayaguez Campus, in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. (Jose R. Almodovar)


Winning 2nd place is this 200x autofluorescent view of a blade of grass by Dr. Donna Stolz of the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania


Winning 2nd place is this 200x autofluorescent view of a blade of grass by Dr. Donna Stolz of the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Dr. Donna Stolz)


Using laser-triggered high-speed macrophotography, Dr. John H. Brackenbury of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, UK, captured this image of a water droplet containing a pair of mosquito larvae


Using laser-triggered high-speed macrophotography, Dr. John H. Brackenbury of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, UK, captured this image of a water droplet containing a pair of mosquito larvae. (Dr. John H. Brackenbury)


Frank Fox of the Fachhochschule Trier in Trier, Germany took 3rd place with this image of a living specimen of Melosira moniliformis


Frank Fox of the Fachhochschule Trier in Trier, Germany took 3rd place with this image of a living specimen of Melosira moniliformis. (Frank Fox)


A three dimensional view of a cell culture of breast cancer cells, by Dr. Jonatas Bussador do Amaral and Dr. Gláucia Maria Machado Santelli of the University of São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil


A three dimensional view of a cell culture of breast cancer cells, by Dr. Jonatas Bussador do Amaral and Dr. Gláucia Maria Machado Santelli of the University of São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil. (Dr. Jonatas Bussador do Amaral, Dr. Gláucia Maria Machado Santelli)


The tip of a butterfly tongue viewed in polarized light by Stephen S. Nagy, M.D. from Helena, Montana


The tip of a butterfly tongue viewed in polarized light by Stephen S. Nagy, M.D. from Helena, Montana. (Stephen S. Nagy, M.D.)


The anterior lateral and median eyes of a jumping spider, observed by Walter Piorkowski of South Beloit, Illinois


The anterior lateral and median eyes of a jumping spider, observed by Walter Piorkowski of South Beloit, Illinois. (Walter Piorkowski)




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Let's get to the point:



The days of only using web design programs like Dreamweaver (and not knowing any code) are pretty much over ... if you want to be a professional web designer.



These days, web designers need to learn code and a few different coding languages, to be able to effectively build modern websites.



... The good news is that it isn't that hard with the right training.
55
Many K12 teachers are now being asked to teach web design for the first time. This presents a challenge since few teachers have professional web design and development ex...
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Are you using the power of PPC to get the international traffic you deserve? This sort of advertising can put a brand or service in front of global customers who would otherwise be out of reach.Even if you already benefit from PPC (pay-per-click) advertising, using the English language will only take you so far in the rapidly changing online landscape…
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Immense Wise is a social network that lets you easily create your own user-powered website.
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Through optimizing your images, it will speed up your wordpress website performance. When you increase the loading speed, it will definitely increase your SEO ranking.
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Search Engine Optimization by Affiliated Business

Since we are now at the point that some search results don't have *ANY* organic search results, it is hard to see much purpose in SEO.

The old Google used to be so useful.. the new Google, not so much. pic.twitter.com/0CtbQYnd7u— SEATTLE SEO (@searchsleuth998) March 31, 2016

It really is like Google is no longer a search engine, and more like a Yahoo! directory.— SEATTLE SEO (@searchsleuth998) March 31, 2016

Maybe the doommasters who called SEO dead for over a decade were finally proved right about SEO?
4

ThemeKiss

For a successful business an outstanding site plays a

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major role, Today a lot of creative professionals have realized this and use Word Press as the engine for building an online site. The ease of use of WordPress, the high number of portfolio styled themes and plugins available for building a professional portfolio web site makes the decision easy. 


1. Extensio ($40)

Extensio is a clean, modern and Powerful Professional Premium Word Press Theme suitable for any kind of corporate / business website. It comes with an impressive jQuery homepage slider with unlimited possibilities and options.


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2. Pure Vision ($45)

Pure Vision is a very powerful theme which suits both, users with no programming background as well as advanced developers. It will help you build your site in no time to your liking with minimal effort.


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3. TryMee ($40)

Try mee It’s a responsive word press theme you’ll love! Try it now on your devices. Clean and stylish corporate design is what you need to create perfect websites.


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4. Classy ($45)

Classy is a premium Word Press theme created to meet your client’s needs. It’s a very clean and elegant business style theme that is super easy to use and customize.


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5. Tre Anni ($37)
Tre Anni Business Theme is clean, elegant and professional Word Press theme that can be used as personal portfolio, business or for a blog website.

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6. Cruz ($45)

A blend of clean and minimalist design style, exclusively crafted for modern business requirements and corporate web sites. You can equally use this theme for personal blogging, portfolio and freelance business ventures.


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7. Adapt (Free)

Ultra is a theme that is ideal for businesses  that want a very clean, elegant and professional website, however, with the custom portfolio and blog templates it is also an awesome website for personal portfolios and blogs.


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8. Display ($45)

Display is a Word press Theme, best suited for Business and Portfolio sites. It comes with a fantastic 3D Image slideshow that can be controlled from your backend with a custom tool.


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9. Ecobiz ($40)

Ecobiz is clean,elegant and modern corporate and business Word Press theme that can be switched as eco/green business and portfolio theme.


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10. Envision ($49)

A top of the line business Word Press theme for any company owner that wants to be one step ahead the competition when it comes to their online presence.


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11. Barely Corporate ($45)

Barely Corporate is a clean Word press theme that couldn’t be more easy to use. With a beautiful exterior and a backend that gives you ultimate versatility and freedom, Barely Corporate will have your website up and running in no time.


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12. Chameleon ($39)

Chameleons are known for their ability to change the color of their skin. The patterns and color combinations you find in chameleons are almost endless, and our new theme is no different! Chameleon was created to be a simple and professional theme with loads of customization options that do not require web development experience to utilize.


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13. Ellora ($37)

Ellora is a simple and clean Word Press Theme for any type of business or portfolio website. It comes with a plethora of options so you can modify styling and fonts directly from within the backend theme option panel.


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14. Fabseries (Free)

Avenue is the very best free real estate theme you will get your hands on. This theme is fully loaded like any premium real estate theme out there.


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15. WPExplorer (Free)

Complete is another Word Press theme created by me! I’ve built it with a very clean, modern and professional design that is very simplistic and content focused. Using custom post types, an advanced admin panel and meta boxes, the Complete theme will allow you to easily set up a business, portfolio and/or blog website.


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16. Thiel ($37)

Thiel Word Press theme comes with elegant responsive design (adaptable to the visitors screen size), unique Elastic slider and takes advantage of new Word Press 3+ features such a custom post types (Portfolio, Slider, Services) or custom taxonomies.


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17. Studium ($40)

Studium is a powerful business corporate portfolio theme based on the custom Vam Tam framework and fully compatible with Word Press 3.3. It presents two subsets of features suitable to users with zero programming skills as well as advanced developers. Studium is the perfect match for your business with predefined styles, theme integrated short codes and widgets, multilingual support and flexible and awesome sliders.


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18. T Studio (Free)

Thao Studio is a clean Free Business Word Press Theme suitable for company, corporate and business sites. Coming with featured posts option and theme options page, this free word press theme would be perfect for you website.


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19. WP Zoom ($69)

Prime is a professional Word Press Theme, that suits perfect for your Business and Portfolio website.


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20. Shelf ($68)

Shelf is a unique tumble log style theme featuring a fluid and responsive design with an original horizontal layout.


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21. Corporate ($40)

RT Theme 9 is best suited for business, corporate, service or portfolio websites.


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22. Powered ($40)

Powered is a modern business and portfolio Word Press theme that serves as a simple yet powerful solution for all sorts of corporate/agency websites. Whether you are looking for a theme for a small business with just a few services or a larger business with many more services/projects, Powered is a good solution.


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23. Infocus ($45)

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24. Duotive ($45)

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25. Maya Shop ($60)

Maya Shop is a fresh Word Press theme that utilizes the powerful Jigo Shop and Woo Commerce plugins to create a versatile Word press powered shop, with unlimited layout options and unlimited skins. Make this theme your own.


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26. Flexum ($40)

Flexum is a beautiful, flexible and responsive Word Press Theme targeted on users without programming skills and also for the experienced developers.


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27. Flagship ($45)

Flagship is a responsive Word Press Theme (try resizing your browser), suited for business websites and users who want to showcase their work on a neat portfolio site.


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28. Karma ($40)

Karma is a Premium Word press Theme built on a highly intelligent framework. It’s the only theme on Theme forest to feature the amazing new CU3ER v1 3D slider. Whether your a word press pro or just a beginner, you’ll have absolutely no problems at all working with this theme.


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29. Greatio ($35)

Greatio is a Premium Word press Theme, best suited for Business, Portfolio, Interior and Architecture sites. It comes with some JQuery scripts which makes it better view.


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30. Full Screen Template ($50)

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Hope you like my above collection, please post your valuable comments.




3

Photoshop is a really powerful tool to draw any digital presentation that we could possibly imagine. Some of us might have familiarized ourselves with Photoshop and may have even been working with it for ages. Still, I often find a Photoshop file stacked with poorly managed layers, causing headaches when a refinement is needed, or when converting it into another format.


messy files


For a graphic or web designer who regularl

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y works in a team environment, where multiple designers may work on a single Photoshop file, the issue of managing and organizing the file suddenly becomes a very important matter.


In general, there are some benefits when we organize our files properly:



It will streamline the workflow.
It helps other designers to understand our design structure easily.
All designers involved with the file can do a revision, quickly and easily, if necessary.
This minimizes errors in the criss-cross production process.

Thus, in the following post, we will share some basic tips to manage and organize Photoshop files so that we can work more efficiently, particularly in a team.



1. Creating folders and managing assets

When working with Photoshop, we typically have many files like photos, backgrounds, fonts and the PSD file itself.


To organize these files and reduce the possibility of chaos, the items should be placed in corresponding folders. So, before we even start up Photoshop, we should create these folders first. For instance, a fonts folder for font files or a background folder for the images we use as backdrops in the design.


font folders


That way, you will be able to do the project faster, as you already know where to go for which file. On the Windows OS, files can be stored according to recent history, which will help you call files even faster.


In web development this practice is obvious. Files and all assets must be placed in the respective directories for the website to work properly, otherwise it would cause a 404 Not Found error.


2. Setting the document properly

In early 2003, I was working with Photoshop for the first time. I did not set up the document properly, which eventually became a real pain during the production process.


Photoshop comes with several preset documents that you can use to quickly and easily create a commonly used standard document for your project. However, often times we need to work with a document size that is not available in the Presets. In these conditions, we have to set up the document ourselves.


Presets Menu


When creating a new document through Files > New... menu or hitting Ctrl / Cmd + N, a new window with several options will pop up. In this dialog we can set document parameters: like the dimension, DPI, background and color mode.


New File


Print Design

When designing a project intended for print, the document will need some pre-requisites to ensure that the document can be printed correctly. It normally needs a 300 dpi resolution and has to be in CMYK color mode to be printed via color separation. Document size may vary depending on the project specifications.



You will also need to ‘bleed’ print designs. To bleed a document is to give it an extended area from the actual document size it will be printed on. This is important for designs that use a colored background instead of white. Bleeding prevents the occurence of white spaces that will turn up when cropping is not done with perfect precision.


Web Design

Designing websites need fewer specifications as it is only for screen view purposes, so a 72 dpi resolution with an RGB color mode should be sufficient. The pixel (px) is used as the unit measurement.



You can save this customized document specification, if you find that you will use it regularly.


3. Naming the layers

We have prepared the files and the new document has been set up. We now move to working with layers.


When we have layers that grow along with our design, it would be better to rename these layers to be more descriptive and meaningful rather than just with random names like Shape 1 or Layer 1. That way we will be able to find the layers we want to edit more easily.



Be descriptive with the name. However, make the layers’ names simple, and short as well. Use your local language if it is the preferred language in your work environment.



4. Grouping the layers

We may find that we have too many layers and these layers are actually several parts that shape a single object. In this case, we can group those layers and name the group to appropriately represent all the layers. We can also create a sub-group and nest it inside a group like a tree structure, if necessary.


When naming the groups, try to be descriptive, simple, short and intuitive. For instance, in web design, we typically have default groups of layers like header, sidebar, content and footer.



This practice will be helpful when working in a team, particularly when we work with developers that tend to work in an orderly and organized fashion. This practice can also be applied in print design projects.


5. Arrange layers or groups in order

Poorly ordered layers will drive anyone insane, and it is a nightmare to look at as well.


Let’s try putting the layers and the groups in a logical order. Have the layers and the groups positioned in the Layer tab as matched with its visual position. For instance, when we have several layers/groups like question, replied, option box and screen, the layers position should be as follows:



That way, anyone who will continue working on the design can intuitively find the layers and the groups faster.


Bonus Tips: Clean up unused layers

Sometimes we try a lot of things to get an effect or look for a design; this often leaves some unused layers. Eliminating these layers will not only keep the Layers tab clean and neat but it also reduces the PSD file size as well.


Conclusion

These practices, ideally, should be done from the moment the first layer is produced. It’s a matter of preferences what sticks and what goes. Some might prefer organizing the layers/groups from the beginning while others might do it after the whole design is complete.


However, these tips are not the only way to be organized and nobody is totally right when it comes to tips and best practices. It all depends on our working experience with Photoshop. Feel free to share and add your experiences in the comments section below.



Related posts:
10 Killer Adobe Photoshop Tips For Designers
How to Create a TRON Minimal Design – Photoshop Tutorial


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An early look at the CrunchPad prototype. (Credit: TechCrunch)It's far from being on store shelves, but some additional details and photos of the CrunchPad, a mobile computing device as envisioned by TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington, have been released. The project's goal was to design and build a ...