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Just a bit of macro photography inspiration…


This image of an ant's head, viewed from the front (at 10X) took 11th place in the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition. The ant's autofluorescence was observed using confocal micrsocopy by Dr. Jan Michels of Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel, in Kiel, Germany


This image of an ant’s head, viewed from the front (at 10X) took 11th place in the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competiti
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on. The ant’s autofluorescence was observed using confocal micrsocopy by Dr. Jan Michels of Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel, in Kiel, Germany. (Dr. Jan Michels)


Dr. Douglas Clark of San Francisco, California submitted this image of the dried wing scales of a butterfly (Cethosia biblis) in incandescent light


Dr. Douglas Clark of San Francisco, California submitted this image of the dried wing scales of a butterfly (Cethosia biblis) in incandescent light. (Dr. Douglas Clark)


HeLa cancer cells viewed at 300x are seen in this 12th Place image by Thomas Deerinck from the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research in La Jolla, California. HeLa is an immortal cell line used in scientific research, made of cells originally sampled from cancer patient Henrietta Lacks in 1951


HeLa cancer cells viewed at 300x are seen in this 12th Place image by Thomas Deerinck from the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research in La Jolla, California. HeLa is an immortal cell line used in scientific research, made of cells originally sampled from cancer patient Henrietta Lacks in 1951. (Thomas Deerinck)


The eye of a live giant waterflea (Leptodora kindtii), observed and submitted by Wim van Egmond of the Micropolitan Museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands


The eye of a live giant waterflea (Leptodora kindtii), observed and submitted by Wim van Egmond of the Micropolitan Museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands. (Wim van Egmond)


Taking 4th place in the competition, Dr. Robin Young of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia used intrinsic fluorescence to observe this specimen of liverwort (Lepidozia reptans) at 20x


Taking 4th place in the competition, Dr. Robin Young of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia used intrinsic fluorescence to observe this specimen of liverwort (Lepidozia reptans) at 20x. (Dr. Robin Young)


Crystal twinning patterns in a leucite crystal from volcanic rock, observed in polarized light by Dr. Michael M. Raith of the Steinmann Institut, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany


Crystal twinning patterns in a leucite crystal from volcanic rock, observed in polarized light by Dr. Michael M. Raith of the Steinmann Institut, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany. (Dr. Michael M. Raith)


A water flea (Daphnia sp.) among green algae (Volvox sp.), an image by Dr. Ralf Wagner of Düsseldorf, Germany


A water flea (Daphnia sp.) among green algae (Volvox sp.), an image by Dr. Ralf Wagner of Düsseldorf, Germany. (Dr. Ralf Wagner)


Pekka Honkakoski of Iisalmi, Finland captured this image of a rare column snowflake with thin, knifelike ice extensions, lit in part by red and blue lighting from opposite sides


Pekka Honkakoski of Iisalmi, Finland captured this image of a rare column snowflake with thin, knifelike ice extensions, lit in part by red and blue lighting from opposite sides. (Pekka Honkakoski)


The embryonic pectoral fin of Chiloscyllium plagiosum, the Whitespotted bamboo shark, observed by Dr. Andrew Gillis, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK


The embryonic pectoral fin of Chiloscyllium plagiosum, the Whitespotted bamboo shark, observed by Dr. Andrew Gillis, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. (Dr. Andrew Gillis)


Taking 20th place was Douglas Moore of the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point in Stevens Point, Wisconsin. Moore's entry shows unpolished agatized dinosaur bone cells, fossilized cellular structure from an animal that lived some 150 million years ago, viewed at 42x


Taking 20th place was Douglas Moore of the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point in Stevens Point, Wisconsin. Moore’s entry shows unpolished agatized dinosaur bone cells, fossilized cellular structure from an animal that lived some 150 million years ago, viewed at 42x. (Douglas Moore)


Charles Krebs from Issaquah, Washington brings us this portrait of a water boatman (Corixidae sp.), viewed in reflected light


Charles Krebs from Issaquah, Washington brings us this portrait of a water boatman (Corixidae sp.), viewed in reflected light. (Charles Krebs)


Primary rat neurons grown as neurospheres, observed by Dr. Rowan Orme of Keele University, Keele, UK


Primary rat neurons grown as neurospheres, observed by Dr. Rowan Orme of Keele University, Keele, UK. (Dr. Rowan Orme)


The double compound eyes of a male St. Mark's fly (Bibio marci), submitted by Dr. David Maitland from Feltwell, UK


The double compound eyes of a male St. Mark’s fly (Bibio marci), submitted by Dr. David Maitland from Feltwell, UK. (Dr. David Maitland)


A naturally formed frost crystal that had grown overnight on a fence in -15 degrees C weather. Image from Jesper Grønne of Silkeborg, Denmark


A naturally formed frost crystal that had grown overnight on a fence in -15 degrees C weather. Image from Jesper Grønne of Silkeborg, Denmark. (Jesper Grønne)


A fish louse (Argulus), viewed at 60x by Wim van Egmond of the Micropolitan Museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands


A fish louse (Argulus), viewed at 60x by Wim van Egmond of the Micropolitan Museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands. (Wim van Egmond)


A closeup view of a velvet mite (Eutrombidium rostratus) by Dr. David Maitland from Feltwell, UK


A closeup view of a velvet mite (Eutrombidium rostratus) by Dr. David Maitland from Feltwell, UK. (Dr. David Maitland)


Dr. Torsten Wittmann of the University of California, San Fransisco, submitted this image of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (BPAE) cells fixed and stained for actin, mitochondria, and DNA


Dr. Torsten Wittmann of the University of California, San Fransisco, submitted this image of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (BPAE) cells fixed and stained for actin, mitochondria, and DNA. (Dr. Torsten Wittmann)


Debora Leite of the University of Sao Paulo, in Sao Paulo, Brazil observed this cross-section of the structure of a sugarcane root


Debora Leite of the University of Sao Paulo, in Sao Paulo, Brazil observed this cross-section of the structure of a sugarcane root. (Debora Leite)


Taking 10th place is this 100x view of a freshwater water flea (Daphnia magna), submitted by Joan Röhl of the Institute for Biochemistry and Biology in Potsdam, Germany


Taking 10th place is this 100x view of a freshwater water flea (Daphnia magna), submitted by Joan Röhl of the Institute for Biochemistry and Biology in Potsdam, Germany. (Joan Röhl)


James H. Nicholson of the Coral Culture and Collaborative Research Facility, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCEHBR & HML in Charleston, South Carolina took 15th Place with this image of lobe coral (Porites lobata), displaying tissue pigmentation response with red fluorescence at 12x


James H. Nicholson of the Coral Culture and Collaborative Research Facility, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCEHBR & HML in Charleston, South Carolina took 15th Place with this image of lobe coral (Porites lobata), displaying tissue pigmentation response with red fluorescence at 12x. (James H. Nicholson)


The 1st place winner, a portrait of a green lacewing (Chrysopa sp.) larva (20x) by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz of the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, Germany


The 1st place winner, a portrait of a green lacewing (Chrysopa sp.) larva (20x) by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz of the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, Germany. (Dr. Igor Siwanowicz)


Benjamin Blonder, David Elliott took 18th place for their image of the venation network of a young quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) leaf. Blonder and Elliott are from the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona


Benjamin Blonder, David Elliott took 18th place for their image of the venation network of a young quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) leaf. Blonder and Elliott are from the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. (Benjamin Blonder, David Elliott)


Jonathan Franks of the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, used autofluorescence to observe this algae biofilm


Jonathan Franks of the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, used autofluorescence to observe this algae biofilm. (Jonathan Franks)


The head and eye of a freshwater shrimp, observed by Jose R. Almodovar of the Microscopy Center, Biology Department, UPR Mayaguez Campus, in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico


The head and eye of a freshwater shrimp, observed by Jose R. Almodovar of the Microscopy Center, Biology Department, UPR Mayaguez Campus, in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. (Jose R. Almodovar)


Winning 2nd place is this 200x autofluorescent view of a blade of grass by Dr. Donna Stolz of the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania


Winning 2nd place is this 200x autofluorescent view of a blade of grass by Dr. Donna Stolz of the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Dr. Donna Stolz)


Using laser-triggered high-speed macrophotography, Dr. John H. Brackenbury of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, UK, captured this image of a water droplet containing a pair of mosquito larvae


Using laser-triggered high-speed macrophotography, Dr. John H. Brackenbury of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, UK, captured this image of a water droplet containing a pair of mosquito larvae. (Dr. John H. Brackenbury)


Frank Fox of the Fachhochschule Trier in Trier, Germany took 3rd place with this image of a living specimen of Melosira moniliformis


Frank Fox of the Fachhochschule Trier in Trier, Germany took 3rd place with this image of a living specimen of Melosira moniliformis. (Frank Fox)


A three dimensional view of a cell culture of breast cancer cells, by Dr. Jonatas Bussador do Amaral and Dr. Gláucia Maria Machado Santelli of the University of São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil


A three dimensional view of a cell culture of breast cancer cells, by Dr. Jonatas Bussador do Amaral and Dr. Gláucia Maria Machado Santelli of the University of São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil. (Dr. Jonatas Bussador do Amaral, Dr. Gláucia Maria Machado Santelli)


The tip of a butterfly tongue viewed in polarized light by Stephen S. Nagy, M.D. from Helena, Montana


The tip of a butterfly tongue viewed in polarized light by Stephen S. Nagy, M.D. from Helena, Montana. (Stephen S. Nagy, M.D.)


The anterior lateral and median eyes of a jumping spider, observed by Walter Piorkowski of South Beloit, Illinois


The anterior lateral and median eyes of a jumping spider, observed by Walter Piorkowski of South Beloit, Illinois. (Walter Piorkowski)




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Here's a good tutorial — How to make an animal hybrid in Photoshop, from Photoshop Daily. "In this free Photoshop tutorial we’ll be covering the techniques used to extract and apply textures from one animal to another." READ MORE...

(posted by Jennifer Apple for www.PhotoshopSupport.com)
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Exclusive - DreamSuite Ultimate Gen1 by Auto FX Software Get 28% Off Exclusively from photoshopsupport.com of Full Version Product and 20% off Upgrades. READ MORE...

(posted by Jennifer Apple for www.PhotoshopSupport.com)
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Today’s freebie is a not so scary Halloween spider. Feel free to use it in commercial and non-commercial projects, personal websites and printed work, as long as it’s a part of a larger design. Please do not sell it, redistribute it yourself, claim it as your own or give it as a bonus item to boost sales for your own products. Download it now!


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en Spider" src="http://pixel.bnetwork.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/pixel77-free-vector-spider-1101-630.jpg" width="630" height="341" title="Free Vector of the Day #457: Halloween Spider" />


 






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loading Free Vector of the Day #457: Halloween Spider






 


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If you're looking to get into the web design/development industry there are loads of resources and courses to help with your education, but deciding which route to pursue is not easy. There are two basic approaches: going to a university for a formal education, or taking a self-taught approach and learning on your own. In recent years a growing number of colleges and universities have added degrees specifically for web design and development, and of course a graphic design/arts degree is also an option.

In this article we'll take a look at the argum
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ents for both approaches, and we'll also provide information on plenty of resources to help you get started with learning on your own if that is the route that you choose. If you're considering a career as a web designer/developer, you'll want to take some time to educate yourself on the options that are available and see what is the best fit for you personally. There is no right or wrong approach, but following a path that isn't the right fit for you can result in a lot of wasted time and money.
Pros of Being Self Taught
When it comes to web design and development you'll often read or hear of someone being "self taught". What this usually means is that this person did not receive a formal education in the field of design or development. In reality, being "self taught" typically involves things like reading books, following online tutorials, watching videos, and plenty of experimentation. The self taught designer still learns from others who are willing to teach, but it's usually by way of informal articles and tutorials rather than a classroom setting. So don't be intimidated at the phrase "self taught" as it does not mean that you will need to figure everything out on your own. With that in mind, here are some of the most convincing reasons why you might want to skip the formal education and just learn on your own.

Smashing Book
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You don't need to remove or disavow links from Site Information Tool because they can't hurt your site's rankings in any way, this is why:All external links on the Site Information Tool pages are already <b>nofollow</b>, you could check it yourself in the HTML source.

Nofollow links <a href="http://support.google.com/webmasters/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=96569">doesn't affect your site rankings and pagerank</a> and Google doesn't penalize you for them…
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There is only two types of web designs because there is just two types of web marketing. Regardless of the market we choose it is a complete and whole market, but there are two major components. That whole market of ours is a lot like an iceberg. There is a smaller group that are ready to buy and they are like the visible part of the iceberg above the water. And then there is the vast and unseen portion below the surface that have not made up their mind and they are looking for more information. Which portion does your web site serve?
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It is not enough for retail stores today to only operate on a physical level. Retailers need to have a great online presence as well. A lot of the same principles that are used in the interior design of a store can also be applied when building a website. Retail websites are unique. They need to be designed differently than online publications or a photographer’s online portfolio.


When a consumer comes to your website, they want a store that is easy to use. The brand message of your business h

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as to come across immediately. Without a good first impression, your store’s site could be scaring away potential customers.


Simple Organization


You would not design the visual merchandising of your store’s physical location in just any way. A store needs to adhere to certain organizational principles. The simpler your layout is, the better it is for your online store. Although you have the possibility of using complex Flash graphics and compounding a lot of information into a small area, it is not recommended for a retail website. Consider researching some popular Internet retailers, as well as your favorite online shopping websites, and see how simple their layouts are. With this in mind, use a website builder with a simple template to set up your retail shop online. Pre-existing templates make it easy for anyone to organize their site.


Display Your Brand


Just because you are keeping it simple on your site does not mean you do not need great images and other visual content to entice consumers. Keep the front page of your website up to date. Just like in an actual store, the freshest products and newest promotions are displayed at the front of the store. Do the same on a website. Make new stock and current specials the first thing that customers see when they arrive on the site’s homepage. If there is anything else that makes your store different than competitors, make it visible on the page. Your business’ website should be streamlined with its branding image. Aspects that make your business unique are an integral part of your branding. For example, this could be something like free shipping or a gift with purchase. Keep the most relevant information of your brand and business on the forefront of your business’ online image.


Website Necessities


Although you want to keep your website user-friendly and in line with your brand, there are some aspects that cannot be overlooked. Every website needs a search bar. It helps customers who are looking for something either general or specific. If your website’s navigation design is lacking, a search bar can prevent the person from leaving your online retail site. In addition to a search bar, every site also needs an easily navigated and organized criteria/category bar. This makes it easy for visitors to navigate through your products in an organized way.


A well-designed online retail site is as important as a store’s brick-and-mortar location. Do not underestimate the value a customer-friendly website will have on your business.




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Editor's note: CreativePro.com will publish reviews of the core CS4 apps throughout the end of October.


Adobe Systems Incorporated (Nasdaq:ADBE) today announced the immediate availability of the Adobe® Creative Suite® 4 product family, the highly anticipated release of industry-leading design and development software for virtually every creative workflow. Delivering radical breakthroughs in workflow efficiency - and packed with hundreds of

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innovative, time saving features - the new Creative Suite 4 product line advances the creative process across print, Web, interactive, film, video and mobile.


Customers can choose from six new versions: Adobe Creative Suite 4 Design Premium, Design Standard, Web Premium, Web Standard, Production Premium and Master Collection. The combination of Creative Suite and the new capabilities of Adobe Flash® Player 10, also available today (see separate press release) deliver new levels of creativity and expressiveness across media channels. Designers using the Adobe Creative Suite 4 product family will gain unprecedented creative control using the new expressive features and visual performance improvements in Adobe Flash Player 10 to deliver breakthrough Web experiences across multiple browsers and operating systems.


As part of the CS4 product launch, the largest in Adobe's history, also available today are brand new versions of Photoshop® CS4, Photoshop CS4 Extended, InDesign® CS4, Illustrator® CS4, Flash CS4 Professional, Dreamweaver® CS4, Fireworks® CS4, Contribute® CS4, After Effects® CS4, Adobe Premiere® Pro CS4, Encore® CS4, Soundbooth® CS4 and Adobe OnLocation(tm) CS4.


Intuitive Workflows Improve Creative Efficiency

A simplified workflow in Adobe Creative Suite 4 enables users to design across media more efficiently by making it easier to complete common tasks and move content seamlessly among applications. InDesign CS4 includes a new Live Preflight tool that allows designers to catch production errors and a newly customizable Links panel to manage placed files more efficiently. The revolutionary new Content-Aware Scaling tool in Photoshop CS4 and Photoshop CS4 Extended automatically recomposes an image as it is resized, preserving vital areas as it adapts to new dimensions. An expanded version of Dynamic Link in CS4 Production Premium enables users to move and update content between After Effects CS4, Adobe Premiere Pro CS4, Soundbooth CS4, and Encore CS4 without rendering, saving countless hours in production. With deep XMP metadata support, the production workflow is simplified, resulting in online content that gives viewers new ways to interact with and search for video, while giving content owners new opportunities to track and monetize content.


Adobe Creative Suite 4 brings 3D center-stage providing the ability to paint, composite, and animate 3D models using familiar tools in Photoshop CS4 Extended. Flash CS4 Professional now offers the ability to apply tweens to objects instead of keyframes, providing greater control over animation attributes. Also in Flash CS4 Professional, the new Bones tool helps create more realistic animations between linked objects. With a searchable library of more than 450 dynamically updated device profiles from leading manufacturers, Adobe Device Central CS4 enables users to easily test mobile content designed using many of the Creative Suite 4 products.


New and Expanded Services Extend Capabilities for Online Collaboration

Adobe Creative Suite 4 now also offers a host of services* for online collaboration. Adobe ConnectNow, a service of Acrobat.com, allows real-time collaboration with two colleagues or clients. Designers can also share color harmonies with Adobe Kuler(tm). Other online resources include: Adobe Community Help for technical questions; Resource Central for accessing video and audio product-related news and tutorials, as well as Soundbooth scores and sound effects; and Adobe Bridge Home, a customizable resource for tips, tutorials, news and inspirational content.


Pricing and Availability

Adobe Creative Suite 4 and its associated point products are immediately available through Adobe Authorized Resellers and the Adobe Store at www.adobe.com/store. Estimated street price for the Adobe Creative Suite 4 Design Premium is US$1799, US$1699 for Adobe Creative Suite 4 Web Premium, US$1699 for Adobe Creative Suite 4 Production Premium, and US$2499 for Adobe Creative Suite 4 Master Collection. To reward customers for staying current, Adobe is offering Creative Suite 3 customers moving to Creative Suite 4 a lower upgrade price than it offers to those moving from older, qualifying versions. For a limited time, a special introductory offer enables customers with older qualifying products to enjoy the same lower price with savings of up to US$200 off their actual upgrade price. For more detailed information please visit www.adobe.com/creativesuite.


Adobe Flash Player 10 is available immediately as a free download for Windows, Macintosh and Linux platforms (including new support for Ubuntu 7 and 8) from www.adobe.com/go/getflashplayer.



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Adobe Ships Creative Suite 3 Production Premium and Master Collection

Adobe Systems Incorporated (Nasdaq:ADBE) today announced the immediate availability of Adobe® Creative Suite® 3 Production Premium and Adobe Creative Suite 3 Master Collection software. Read More


New Video Tutorials for Adobe Creative Suite 3 Production Premium

Total Training, Inc., a pioneer in engaging and innovative video-based training, today released Total Training for Adobe® Creative Suite® 3 Production Premium. Read More




Adobe Introduces Creative Suite 4 Product Family

Adobe Systems Incorporated (Nasdaq:ADBE) today announced the Adobe® Creative Suite® 4 product family, a milestone release of the industry-leading design and development software for virtually every... Read More


Adobe Unleashes Creative Suite 3 Product Line

Adobe Systems Incorporated (Nasdaq:ADBE) today announced the Adobe® Creative Suite® 3 product line, a revolutionary offering of tightly integrated, industry-leading design and development tools for... Read More










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This set of Photoshop /GIMP brushes is made up of paintable textures. You can see some of them in the preview image above. These are great for digital artists or graphic designers that want to paint with some texture, rather than just a plain round brush. They’re also great for adding texture to just about anything with a few clicks. These are all high resolution images, with the average brush size being about 1900 pixels. READ MORE...

(posted by Jennifer Apple for www.PhotoshopSupport.com)
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