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Friends, this is a notepaper PSD mockup pinned to a wooden board. This is one creative way to showcase your...
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Unemployment is a global problem as many countries still find themselves in the midst of a recession (or are just crawling out of one). That means, competition is high for open positions in almost every field.


Managing a profitable business during a recession is not easy, especially for the self-employed. However working from an office is not the only safe option. Despite the dim outlook, many opportunities for home based businesses still exist. Any task that can be accomplished at home can become a home based business.


Online Businesses

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Many home based businesses choose to start an online business. Online businesses are no longer limited to virtual storefronts selling a product. Today, home based businesses include blogs about product reviews, political commentary or humor, and are created and owned by a single individual, working from a home office; also, they are pretty easy to make using a free website maker. Social networks have expanded the reach of the party business, allowing the party organizer to sit at a desk while reaching out to potential customers across the globe. Freelance workers are no longer only writers and journalists, but include programmers, web site designers, graders for university courses, editors, publishers and artists. Consulting services for making green choices for the home and business, help organizing and removing clutter, or public relations can also be home based businesses. While sales of physical products are still the most widespread home based business, new ideas are constantly being explored. A quick search will yield pages of results for websites dedicated to ideas for home based businesses and the tools to manage an online business. The possibility of generating income from home is not declining, but growing.


Revisited Idea


The idea of a home based business has been in existence for centuries. Prior to the Industrial Revolution, most businesses were managed from the home. Farming was not only for subsistence; excess crops would be sold or bartered. Homes produced goods for commercial sale including cloth, lace, medicines, baked goods, toys and other necessities. Workers in skilled trades such as furniture making or blacksmithing worked out of their homes or a nearby shop. Writers would sit at home putting pen to paper creating novels, poetry, newspaper and journal articles.


After the Industrial Revolution, the home based business declined, as machine made products were less expensive and produced more quickly. Yet families still lived above the stores operated on the ground floor, and clothing alterations were still carried out by individuals. In the 1950s, the party plan (or Tupperware Party) opened a new type of home based business, that has expended to the cosmetics and kitchen goods industries. Today, home based businesses still include farms selling their produce, crafters with handmade goods ranging from clothing to home decorations and artisans producing custom work with more detail than mass-production machinery. The methods by which products and services are bought and sold may change, but the home business opportunity will always have a niche in the marketplace.


The exact number of home-based businesses today is unknown. According to a U.S. Bureau of Labor report, there are approximately 18.3 million home-based businesses, while other reports have that number at close to 38 million. Either way, millions are taking the plunge back into home-based businesses, thanks to the ease of working from home through Internet opportunities.




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User can also customize these themes according to his requirements and are able to choose different backgrounds, windows’ colors and...
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One of the key components of good web design for an eCommerce store is the logo. Through your logo, you can set your store apart, and you can also make it easier for people to recognize your store. The logo should appear in one of the top corners on every page. You should also use it on your social media platforms to make sure people can quickly identify you. However, constructing a logo is more than just coming up with an image. You must make sure that you develop the logo so that it works within your overall web design

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and remains identifiable.


Simplified Palette


Some of the best logos are also some of the simplest. Think of the McDonald’s logo and the Target logo. Both of these logos are exceptionally simple in their formation, and they only have one or two colors. They aren’t great works of art. They aren’t incredible to look at. They are simple, and they are recognizable. If your logo has more than two colors, then you need to reconsider your logo design. You don’t have to match every color present in your web design in the logo. Choose the primary or the contrast color as the main logo color, and keep the color selection as simple as possible.


Viewability Regardless of the Size


You never know what devices people will be viewing your website or your social media pages on. Having a recognizable logo allows customers to immediately connect it with your brand. This means that you need to have a logo that is viewable regardless of the size. In other words, it should be viewable as a thumbnail as well as a on a large screen. Most of the time, when you’re using something like furniture web templates, you will have the option of uploading a standard sized logo as well as various thumbnails. Check to make sure that the logo can be viewed clearly in each of these sizes. To help achieve this goal, you should make sure that you use clean lines and avoid anything that distorts when it is shrunk.


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Memorable Logo


The logo itself needs to be memorable. Otherwise, it does no good. Creating memorability can be challenging, but most businesses accomplish this by tapping into the core of their business. In some cases, you must think of your business in an abstract fashion. Target developed the bull’s eye to represent getting the best sales each and every time. Most people don’t automatically associate bull’s eyes with shopping, but Target managed to create that association. It is now one of the more commonly known logos in the United States.


When you are developing your logo, you need to keep in mind certain key elements for the design so that it will work within your web design as a whole. First, make sure that you use only a simplified palette. Logos are not places for details. Make sure that the logo itself remains viewable, regardless of the scale. This way, people can recognize it quickly. Also take the time to develop a logo that is memorable, even if you have to think outside the box.




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In this tutorial, we’ll learn how to create a Retro Lights and Lazers wallpaper in Photoshop with vibrant colours and...
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Mobile websites are predicted to be just as big, if not bigger, in 2014 as they were in 2013. More than 80 percent of stores have either developed mobile sites or have plans to develop them over the next couple years. For informational sites, the challenge is in discerning how they can translate their typical communication measures onto a mobile website. The forum, for instance, remains popular on most informational sites, even with the proliferation of social media platforms like Facebook. If your site has a forum, here

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are some things you want to remember when translating your forum into a mobile-friendly format.


Think Big Buttons


One of the biggest challenges with forums on a mobile website is the fact that they rely so heavily on small buttons. From the forum menu to the individual threads and responses, a forum requires significantly more clicking than the average website. Because the average mobile user will be using his finger rather than a mouse, precision is significantly compromised. The best way to avoid your visitors from clicking on the wrong link over and over again before they finally get frustrated and leave is to make sure that you have very large buttons for the forum itself. On most mobile devices, this means that only two or three threads may be visible at a time. But it also means that when visitors click on a link, they can actually hit it.


Enable Continuous Browsing


When it comes to the best mobile web design, continuous browsing is definitely an effective component. Continuous browsing allows the user to immerse himself in the online experience without having to click on additional pages. When you set up a forum on your mobile website, you need to make sure that continuous browsing is enabled and works efficiently. Once you set up large buttons, only a few of the threads will be visible at any given time. But with continuous browsing, your visitors can keep scrolling down until they find the threads they want.


Cut All Tails


In most forums, people can respond with the full text of the previous post in the message. But when you are setting up a mobile friendly website and forum, you need to cut this tail. Set it up so the default requires that visitors only submit original content. Tails will automatically be removed. If a visitor wants to quote a section from a previous post, he can opt to do so, but make sure that they can’t just copy and paste the entire post as this will slow down the browsing experience for everyone.


Adding a forum to your mobile-friendly site can be an important way to keep up the communication, particularly if your visitors expect that from your traditional site. However, to make it work, you must be prepared to make some changes. You will need to develop large buttons for the forum options to the people can easily access the sections they want. You should also enable continuous browsing, and you need to make sure that all tails are cut to minimize excessively long posts.




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In this tutorial, we will explain how to illustrate a pair of blue sports shoes. This illustration is simple and...
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this trend make more appealing our data and information in-front of our customers and clients, infographics helps to communicate a...
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Just a bit of macro photography inspiration…


This image of an ant's head, viewed from the front (at 10X) took 11th place in the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition. The ant's autofluorescence was observed using confocal micrsocopy by Dr. Jan Michels of Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel, in Kiel, Germany


This image of an ant’s head, viewed from the front (at 10X) took 11th place in the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competiti
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on. The ant’s autofluorescence was observed using confocal micrsocopy by Dr. Jan Michels of Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel, in Kiel, Germany. (Dr. Jan Michels)


Dr. Douglas Clark of San Francisco, California submitted this image of the dried wing scales of a butterfly (Cethosia biblis) in incandescent light


Dr. Douglas Clark of San Francisco, California submitted this image of the dried wing scales of a butterfly (Cethosia biblis) in incandescent light. (Dr. Douglas Clark)


HeLa cancer cells viewed at 300x are seen in this 12th Place image by Thomas Deerinck from the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research in La Jolla, California. HeLa is an immortal cell line used in scientific research, made of cells originally sampled from cancer patient Henrietta Lacks in 1951


HeLa cancer cells viewed at 300x are seen in this 12th Place image by Thomas Deerinck from the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research in La Jolla, California. HeLa is an immortal cell line used in scientific research, made of cells originally sampled from cancer patient Henrietta Lacks in 1951. (Thomas Deerinck)


The eye of a live giant waterflea (Leptodora kindtii), observed and submitted by Wim van Egmond of the Micropolitan Museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands


The eye of a live giant waterflea (Leptodora kindtii), observed and submitted by Wim van Egmond of the Micropolitan Museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands. (Wim van Egmond)


Taking 4th place in the competition, Dr. Robin Young of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia used intrinsic fluorescence to observe this specimen of liverwort (Lepidozia reptans) at 20x


Taking 4th place in the competition, Dr. Robin Young of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia used intrinsic fluorescence to observe this specimen of liverwort (Lepidozia reptans) at 20x. (Dr. Robin Young)


Crystal twinning patterns in a leucite crystal from volcanic rock, observed in polarized light by Dr. Michael M. Raith of the Steinmann Institut, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany


Crystal twinning patterns in a leucite crystal from volcanic rock, observed in polarized light by Dr. Michael M. Raith of the Steinmann Institut, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany. (Dr. Michael M. Raith)


A water flea (Daphnia sp.) among green algae (Volvox sp.), an image by Dr. Ralf Wagner of Düsseldorf, Germany


A water flea (Daphnia sp.) among green algae (Volvox sp.), an image by Dr. Ralf Wagner of Düsseldorf, Germany. (Dr. Ralf Wagner)


Pekka Honkakoski of Iisalmi, Finland captured this image of a rare column snowflake with thin, knifelike ice extensions, lit in part by red and blue lighting from opposite sides


Pekka Honkakoski of Iisalmi, Finland captured this image of a rare column snowflake with thin, knifelike ice extensions, lit in part by red and blue lighting from opposite sides. (Pekka Honkakoski)


The embryonic pectoral fin of Chiloscyllium plagiosum, the Whitespotted bamboo shark, observed by Dr. Andrew Gillis, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK


The embryonic pectoral fin of Chiloscyllium plagiosum, the Whitespotted bamboo shark, observed by Dr. Andrew Gillis, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. (Dr. Andrew Gillis)


Taking 20th place was Douglas Moore of the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point in Stevens Point, Wisconsin. Moore's entry shows unpolished agatized dinosaur bone cells, fossilized cellular structure from an animal that lived some 150 million years ago, viewed at 42x


Taking 20th place was Douglas Moore of the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point in Stevens Point, Wisconsin. Moore’s entry shows unpolished agatized dinosaur bone cells, fossilized cellular structure from an animal that lived some 150 million years ago, viewed at 42x. (Douglas Moore)


Charles Krebs from Issaquah, Washington brings us this portrait of a water boatman (Corixidae sp.), viewed in reflected light


Charles Krebs from Issaquah, Washington brings us this portrait of a water boatman (Corixidae sp.), viewed in reflected light. (Charles Krebs)


Primary rat neurons grown as neurospheres, observed by Dr. Rowan Orme of Keele University, Keele, UK


Primary rat neurons grown as neurospheres, observed by Dr. Rowan Orme of Keele University, Keele, UK. (Dr. Rowan Orme)


The double compound eyes of a male St. Mark's fly (Bibio marci), submitted by Dr. David Maitland from Feltwell, UK


The double compound eyes of a male St. Mark’s fly (Bibio marci), submitted by Dr. David Maitland from Feltwell, UK. (Dr. David Maitland)


A naturally formed frost crystal that had grown overnight on a fence in -15 degrees C weather. Image from Jesper Grønne of Silkeborg, Denmark


A naturally formed frost crystal that had grown overnight on a fence in -15 degrees C weather. Image from Jesper Grønne of Silkeborg, Denmark. (Jesper Grønne)


A fish louse (Argulus), viewed at 60x by Wim van Egmond of the Micropolitan Museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands


A fish louse (Argulus), viewed at 60x by Wim van Egmond of the Micropolitan Museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands. (Wim van Egmond)


A closeup view of a velvet mite (Eutrombidium rostratus) by Dr. David Maitland from Feltwell, UK


A closeup view of a velvet mite (Eutrombidium rostratus) by Dr. David Maitland from Feltwell, UK. (Dr. David Maitland)


Dr. Torsten Wittmann of the University of California, San Fransisco, submitted this image of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (BPAE) cells fixed and stained for actin, mitochondria, and DNA


Dr. Torsten Wittmann of the University of California, San Fransisco, submitted this image of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (BPAE) cells fixed and stained for actin, mitochondria, and DNA. (Dr. Torsten Wittmann)


Debora Leite of the University of Sao Paulo, in Sao Paulo, Brazil observed this cross-section of the structure of a sugarcane root


Debora Leite of the University of Sao Paulo, in Sao Paulo, Brazil observed this cross-section of the structure of a sugarcane root. (Debora Leite)


Taking 10th place is this 100x view of a freshwater water flea (Daphnia magna), submitted by Joan Röhl of the Institute for Biochemistry and Biology in Potsdam, Germany


Taking 10th place is this 100x view of a freshwater water flea (Daphnia magna), submitted by Joan Röhl of the Institute for Biochemistry and Biology in Potsdam, Germany. (Joan Röhl)


James H. Nicholson of the Coral Culture and Collaborative Research Facility, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCEHBR & HML in Charleston, South Carolina took 15th Place with this image of lobe coral (Porites lobata), displaying tissue pigmentation response with red fluorescence at 12x


James H. Nicholson of the Coral Culture and Collaborative Research Facility, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCEHBR & HML in Charleston, South Carolina took 15th Place with this image of lobe coral (Porites lobata), displaying tissue pigmentation response with red fluorescence at 12x. (James H. Nicholson)


The 1st place winner, a portrait of a green lacewing (Chrysopa sp.) larva (20x) by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz of the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, Germany


The 1st place winner, a portrait of a green lacewing (Chrysopa sp.) larva (20x) by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz of the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, Germany. (Dr. Igor Siwanowicz)


Benjamin Blonder, David Elliott took 18th place for their image of the venation network of a young quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) leaf. Blonder and Elliott are from the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona


Benjamin Blonder, David Elliott took 18th place for their image of the venation network of a young quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) leaf. Blonder and Elliott are from the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. (Benjamin Blonder, David Elliott)


Jonathan Franks of the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, used autofluorescence to observe this algae biofilm


Jonathan Franks of the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, used autofluorescence to observe this algae biofilm. (Jonathan Franks)


The head and eye of a freshwater shrimp, observed by Jose R. Almodovar of the Microscopy Center, Biology Department, UPR Mayaguez Campus, in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico


The head and eye of a freshwater shrimp, observed by Jose R. Almodovar of the Microscopy Center, Biology Department, UPR Mayaguez Campus, in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. (Jose R. Almodovar)


Winning 2nd place is this 200x autofluorescent view of a blade of grass by Dr. Donna Stolz of the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania


Winning 2nd place is this 200x autofluorescent view of a blade of grass by Dr. Donna Stolz of the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Dr. Donna Stolz)


Using laser-triggered high-speed macrophotography, Dr. John H. Brackenbury of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, UK, captured this image of a water droplet containing a pair of mosquito larvae


Using laser-triggered high-speed macrophotography, Dr. John H. Brackenbury of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, UK, captured this image of a water droplet containing a pair of mosquito larvae. (Dr. John H. Brackenbury)


Frank Fox of the Fachhochschule Trier in Trier, Germany took 3rd place with this image of a living specimen of Melosira moniliformis


Frank Fox of the Fachhochschule Trier in Trier, Germany took 3rd place with this image of a living specimen of Melosira moniliformis. (Frank Fox)


A three dimensional view of a cell culture of breast cancer cells, by Dr. Jonatas Bussador do Amaral and Dr. Gláucia Maria Machado Santelli of the University of São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil


A three dimensional view of a cell culture of breast cancer cells, by Dr. Jonatas Bussador do Amaral and Dr. Gláucia Maria Machado Santelli of the University of São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil. (Dr. Jonatas Bussador do Amaral, Dr. Gláucia Maria Machado Santelli)


The tip of a butterfly tongue viewed in polarized light by Stephen S. Nagy, M.D. from Helena, Montana


The tip of a butterfly tongue viewed in polarized light by Stephen S. Nagy, M.D. from Helena, Montana. (Stephen S. Nagy, M.D.)


The anterior lateral and median eyes of a jumping spider, observed by Walter Piorkowski of South Beloit, Illinois


The anterior lateral and median eyes of a jumping spider, observed by Walter Piorkowski of South Beloit, Illinois. (Walter Piorkowski)




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The increasing accumulation of new hardware, applications, and IT software makes it extremely difficult to remediate security vulnerabilities. The Microsoft SCCM third party tools cannot offer comprehensive security that includes many outside products such as Google, Apple, Adobe, Mozilla, and others. Keeping up with patches needed to make systems run smoothly often requires system administrators to hire extra help to keep current with rapidly changing IT systems. Solar Winds Patch Manager helps cut down on the time needed for research, testing, and implementation of common third-party appl

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ications.


Busy IT managers want laptops, servers, desktop computers, and mobile devices to run smoothly and interact flawlessly, but conflicting applications inevitably cause problems that need some sort of fix. Third-party patching software extends the capabilities of Microsoft SCCM and WSUS. Solar Winds offers free downloads and trials of their software that really work. Other companies offer downloads that managers find disabled in some way, but the company offers the genuine versions, so busy IT staff do not waste time downloading useless software.


The competitive global business environment demands that IT staff do more work with fewer resources. Despite Windows 7 advances and intuitive software applications, operating systems fall short in their ability to integrate plug-ins and third party programs. The National Vulnerability Database has published reports that disprove the common assumption that Microsoft applications pose the biggest threat to security. The study found that 90 percent of threats came from other software vendors such as Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari, Adobe Flash Player, Java Runtime, and Adobe Shockwave.


Companies can manage hardware, servers, and third-party applications simply and accurately, guaranteeing that the right patches go to the right machines. SW patch software, formerly known as EminentWare, deploys SCCM third party patches in hours instead of weeks, and companies can try the software free. When major IT companies buy out their competitors, savvy business owners understand the reason comes from product reliability. IT managers can trust these products for solving their security headache.







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